[ P I N O Y - C U L T U R E ]

Created on March 22, 2012, this blog is dedicated to the rich and diverse Philippine cultures and it's people. You will find here pictures of the indigenous, music, dances, baybayin art, places in the Philippines, tattoos, animistic beliefs, myths and legends, deities, food, martial arts, and everything that makes us Pilipin@, as well as our fellow Pin@ys from all over the world.

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lowtekstudios:

Some of the many dishes and great drinks found at Topsilog Express!

http://www.yelp.com/biz/tapsilog-express-hayward

Please visit them! 

Photos by Tim of Low Tek Studios

be1le:

The Courtship Dance of the T’boli Tribe

 T’boli dances may act out relationships between suitors and beloved or between bride or groom. In the courtship dance, a boy pursues a girl who taunts him with in unfurled kayab or turban, which she hold by the ends and sways side-to-side, following a musical beat. 

famous black pin@ys (click for info)

For my Pilipin@ Blasians. This is for you. <3

Especially those who feel insecure in being who they are. To those I’ve talked to on here who have messaged me and told me how they feel ashamed to identify with their Pilipin@ heritage for the fact people tell them they don’t “look” Pilipin@, or that they weren’t really raised in this side of their heritage.

Know that you aren’t alone and should be proud of who you are and where you came from.

(Source: libulan)

akopito:

Bangut - Facial Tattoo by Akopito

akopito:

Bangut - Facial Tattoo by Akopito

akopito:

Visayan Tattoo design (The marking of snake and lizard or any other design)

"when they say snake and lizard they actually meant Python and Crocodile :D

http://akopito.weebly.com/1/post/2014/02/visayan-tattoo-design.html

mkpcn2014:

UC Davis Fil-Am Showcase 2014

PCN Tinikling Team, MK Modern, and MK Vintage Dance Troupe’s Road to Davis Dance Revolution 2014. Come and support them this weekend!

abbydraws:

Goddess of Love
(Precolonial Philippines)

Another take on the Tagalog Goddess, Diyan Masalanta.

abbydraws:

Goddess of Love

(Precolonial Philippines)

Another take on the Tagalog Goddess, Diyan Masalanta.

indiohistorian:

"The East Shall Be Alight with the Glory of Our Liberation"

April 9, 1942. What great irony it is to call the defeat of the Philippine and American Army by the Imperial Japanese invaders as “Araw ng Kagitingan.” Day of Valor. As if the name of the holiday was a great cover up to the greatest defeat of the U.S. Army (and shall I say, the Philippine as well) in history. At least that’s how it would appear to anyone in the country who are just feeling the relief because of the holiday, a nice interruption, to the drudgery of work in the middle of the week. But to a selected few, wrinkled in years, who witnessed the horrors of war, famine and death, those years were traumatic. The scars on their skin could never capture the reality of the endless banging of the guns, of the Japanese shouts they couldn’t understand, the cries of desperation of their fellowmen. They, our lolos and lolas, are tucked within our homes, but oh what stories they tell. They would tell us how the explosions and shelling of Bataan and Corregidor could be heard even from the Dewey Boulevard (now Roxas Boulevard, Manila). They would tell us how they witnessed many of their loved ones fight at Bataan, expecting a reinforcement and rescue that never came. Some men who fought have married just before the outbreak of war, and at the call of the newly formed Philippine government under Quezon, just 6 years old (from 1935 to 1941), they left everything, their family, to join the war, full of optimism, but knowing full well the uncertainty of what they were facing.

We call it Araw ng Kagitingan, because it was precisely in spite of the knowledge of their impending defeat that they kept on fighting as long as they could. They are the Greatest Generation. 

These commemorations serve not only as rest for us who work in our offices and labor in our schools. It also is a pause to remember that the freedom we breathe every single day is costly. It’s cost was blood. And we take on this freedom, consciously and responsibly. My Lolo Urbano died on the battlefield two days short of the surrender. I grieve even when I didn’t get to know the man, but I’m proud that his blood and mine are one. 

I will always remember as a historian the radio broadcast of Norman Reyes, written by Capt. Salvador P. Lopez via “The Voice of Freedom” alluding the whole defeat to the story of Christ’s seeming defeat and eventual triumph (because it happened past Holy Week: 

“All of us know the story of Easter Sunday. It was the triumph of light over darkness, life over death. It was the vindication of a seemingly unreasonable faith. It was the glorious resurrection of a leader, only three days before defeated and executed like a common felon.

Today, on the commemoration of that Resurrection, we can humbly and without presumption declare our faith and hope in our own resurrection, our own inevitable victory.

We, too, were betrayed by Judases. We were taken in the night by force of arms, and though we had done wrong to no man, our people were bound and delivered into the hands of our enemies. We have been with mock symbols of sovereignty, denied by weaklings, lashed with repeated oppression, tortured and starved. We have been given gall to drink, and we have shed our blood. To those who look upon us from afar it must seem the Filipino people have descended into hell, into the valley of death. But we know that the patient and watching men who said their simple prayers in the hills of Bataan, have not lost faith, and we know that the hushed congregations in the churches throughout the land, drew from the gospel as Mass renewed hope in their resurrection. To all of them we give today the message of the angel of Easter morning: “Be not afraid, for He is risen.”

We, too, shall rise. After we have paid the full price of our redemption, we shall return to show the scars of sacrifices that all may touch and believe. When the trumpets sound the hour we shall roll aside the stone before the tomb and the tyrant guards shall scatter in confusion. No wall of stone shall then be strong enough to contain us, no human force shall suffice to hold us in subjection, we shall rise in the name of freedom and the East shall be alight with the glory of our liberation.”

It should be noted that their defeat was not in vain. Bataan was a thorn in the flesh for the Japanese who could not push through with their plan of expansion as scheduled. From January to April 9, 1942. More than three months. Only a firm conviction could make them hold the defenses that long. 

Read the complete transcription of the “Voice of Freedom” broadcast here

Here are my posts related to World War II, the bloodiest war in human history at the cost of millions of lives.

*All photos belong to their respective owners.

malacanan:

Today is the 72nd anniversary of the fall of Bataan. The Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office has published a special page on the Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines website.
Through the page, we hope to pay a modest tribute to the heroism of the veterans of World War II, and honor the depth of their sacrifice made in the name of their country and their countrymen. The page contains a brief background on the Araw ng Kagitingan as a national holiday, a comprehensive timeline of World War II in the Philippines, interactive maps that include the route of the Bataan Death March, and excerpts from selected memoirs of Filipino veterans who served during World War II, among many others.

Tumblr folk, stay tuned! We’ve got a bunch of interesting bits of history worth refreshing your dashboards for later in the day! Happy Araw ng Kagitingan!

malacanan:

Today is the 72nd anniversary of the fall of Bataan. The Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office has published a special page on the Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines website.

Through the page, we hope to pay a modest tribute to the heroism of the veterans of World War II, and honor the depth of their sacrifice made in the name of their country and their countrymen. The page contains a brief background on the Araw ng Kagitingan as a national holiday, a comprehensive timeline of World War II in the Philippines, interactive maps that include the route of the Bataan Death March, and excerpts from selected memoirs of Filipino veterans who served during World War II, among many others.

Tumblr folk, stay tuned! We’ve got a bunch of interesting bits of history worth refreshing your dashboards for later in the day! Happy Araw ng Kagitingan!