Created on March 22, 2012, this blog is dedicated to the rich and diverse Philippine cultures and it's people. You will find here pictures of the indigenous, music, dances, baybayin art, places in the Philippines, tattoos, animistic beliefs, myths and legends, deities, food, martial arts, and everything that makes us Pilipin@, as well as our fellow Pin@ys from all over the world.



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October is Filipino American Heritage Month

racismschool:

Happy Filipino American Heritage Month Everyone!

bacolod:

Manila (AFP) - Philippine officials said Saturday they had set a new world record for the most trees planted in an hour, with 3.2 million seedlings sown as part of a national forestation programme.

bacolod:

Manila (AFP) - Philippine officials said Saturday they had set a new world record for the most trees planted in an hour, with 3.2 million seedlings sown as part of a national forestation programme.

Anonymous asked: hi, i was wondering where the gif on your sidebar is from?

Its from a period drama series called Amaya that takes place in the 1500’s in the Bisayas. You can check the Amaya tag on the blog for more info.

layersoflife:

I really feel like my aspiration to become a social studies teacher/professor comes from my constant need/desire to preserve the long history and struggles of poc

and maybe it’s also my internal struggle with connecting with my Filipin@ culture 

I remember the day my grandmother sat me down and told me her stories about the war and all I remember is thinking, “I have to preserve this. People have to remember this.” 

dj-nicatine:

Getting ready to practice the #Dugso dance. It is a dance that invokes protection & blessings from the #Gods. 🙏 #KayamananNgLahi #Filipino #IndiginousDance  (at Search to Involve Pilipino Americans (SIPA))

dj-nicatine:

Getting ready to practice the #Dugso dance. It is a dance that invokes protection & blessings from the #Gods. 🙏 #KayamananNgLahi #Filipino #IndiginousDance (at Search to Involve Pilipino Americans (SIPA))

centerforartandthought:

Soap, water, and toothbrush – how Filipino hands rediscover quality

When mom sets up the balikbayan [gifts and goods sent to family and friends remaining in the Philippines] box, she disappears inside the cardboard container with a roll of duct tape to secure its corners. Stacks of canned food, toothpaste tubes, hard candies, and linens surround the basement floor in a line-up of what will go into the box first. We’d stock up on these items over a few months, keeping in mind our family’s preferences and favorite American products. Along with groceries, mom would ask everyone to sort out what we have and find things we’d be willing to send as a gift abroad. Mom’s guidelines to balikbayan box hand-me-downs: 

Clothes that are too small would fit your younger cousin.

Clothes that are out of style would be a big hit with the teenagers.

Old shoes and clothes with a little bit of wear and tear, your tita can fix that. 

Even pairs of sneakers covered in dirt were acceptable to add into the box. If using an old toothbrush to scrub the shoes clean worked for us, it surely wouldn’t be a problem for our relatives to do. Though I’ve never been to the Philippines, I imagine the skill of my family’s hands as they handle the balikbayan box, in all its excessive duct tape glory.

Everything we would have typically tossed aside as unwanted is a gem in their eyes. It doesn’t mean that our relatives have bad taste and don’t deserve brand new clothes. What this whole gesture proves is that we are so quick to find a replacement for the sake of convenience. If there’s a major stain on a shirt, I might buy a new shirt instead of experimenting with bleach. In the Philippines, our relatives would handwash the stain away. With soap and water, they’d use a toothbrush against the dirty soles of shoes. They’d get every corner until it looks brand new.

My relatives don’t necessarily need the balikbayan box, but sending these goods to the Philippines is considered our pasalubong. It translates to “something for when you welcome me,” similar to the concept of souvenir giving. Coming from a nation whose greatest export is its people, Filipino immigrants pack balikbayan boxes as a way of giving back to the family they left behind. It’s a thank you for the continuous support and an invitation for the whole family to enjoy the success gained abroad. Sending balikbayan box isn’t necessarily an obligation, but duty to the family plays a strong part in the giving. It’s a thoughtful gesture that reminds family in the Philippines that they’re remembered despite the long distance. However, in most cases, many overseas Filipinos’ leave home in order to support their families in the homeland.

Along with requested items and groceries (Toblerone by the bulk and all the canned goods after a ShopRite Can Can Sale), secondhand items are part of the pasalubong. Mom encourages us to give what we don’t want because in the Philippines someone will treasure them. They may not be the family member who the gift is intended to (we’re all guilty of regifting what we don’t like), but the wealth of balikbayan boxes are typically shared in the neighborhood. Growing up, my parents expressed the importance of valuing what we own and how as kids they maintained the condition of their belongings. They understand the resourcefulness of Filipinos and thus, pack the balikbayan box for our loved ones.

When the box finally arrives after a month of shipping, I would see things I once owned worn by someone in a photograph. The person may not even be a relative but someone in the neighborhood my family extended the gifts to. Somehow my clothes don’t look the same in these pictures. They appear spotless, clean, almost perfect. My family’s kamayan—both the givers and receivers—values what we have as blessings. One end prepares a box to send on a ship across the world, and the other puts in the effort and skill I wish I had. With clothes in a tub of water, my relatives rub the fabric against itself to rid dirt and stains. They know how to take care of their belongings with a hand labor that seems natural. They know the friction that rediscovers the quality of hand me down clothes. My relatives in the Philippines preserve the condition of their material goods. They are the best people to send gifts to because most of the time, they know its worth more than we do. 

gerilya:



INA, ASAWA, BAYANILive Mural by GerilyaFlat Latex on Plywoodfor Zonta Philippines Bazaar EventRockwell Tent, Powerplant Mall2014

gerilya:

INA, ASAWA, BAYANI
Live Mural by Gerilya
Flat Latex on Plywood
for Zonta Philippines Bazaar Event
Rockwell Tent, Powerplant Mall
2014
atemozzarella:

3 of 5 portraits for my thesis :) 
Idiyanale, goddess of good labor, agriculture, and mariculture

One of the major fertility and harvest Tagalog deities along with Lakapati and Lakan Bakod.

atemozzarella:

3 of 5 portraits for my thesis :) 

Idiyanale, goddess of good labor, agriculture, and mariculture

One of the major fertility and harvest Tagalog deities along with Lakapati and Lakan Bakod.

fantomdranzerx asked: I discovered this blog only last weekend and I want to thank you for making it. :) I'm Filipino-American, and I really like all your posts on history and mythology, particularly the latter, since you have posts on pre-colonial beliefs (most of the tales I heard were after colonization--- like duwende and aswangs). So thanks again! :)

Haha well this blog started out while I was first researching and learning about our precolonial past so it’s no surprise. As for precolonial beliefs and our mythologies, it was actually the push that led me to actually start looking into our history and cultures actually.

Well I am Pagan, specifically a Polytheistic Reconstructionist, so when I was curious if we had our own mythology and precolonial indigenous beliefs I started researching which eventually led me to researching our precolonial cultures and history and which eventually led me to create this blog as my outlet.

Without those two interests, particularly in terms of my religious beliefs, I doubt I would have gotten to being so passionate about learning and researching about our rich diverse cultures and history and sharing what I have learned and learning from others on here as well.

theysayidontcount asked: Hi! I was just wondering if you know of any Filipino "artifacts". I have to do this project for Anthropology where we bring in an artifact from our culture, and my dad doesn't really know of anything. Some help would be great because I have no clue what I'm doing. Just anything that I guess has been part of the culture for a long time. Love your blog by the way! :)

By artifact do you mean actual artifacts or something related to our culture? Reason why I’m asking is because you said you have to bring it which obviously one can’t bring in an artifact unless they have bought the copies made and sold.

But for artifacts you can check out the artifact tag on the blog. Some artifacts are the Golden Tara, Laguna Copperplate, Angono Petroglyphs, Manunggal Jar, Bolinao Skull, the gold artifacts of Surigao, & Butuan, the Calatagan Pot, the Butuan Ivory Seal, and the Maitum Anthropomorphic Potteries just to name a few.

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